Articles Tagged with deception

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An Uwchlan Township woman allegedly claimed she had cancer in a purported attempt to scam people who donated to her fundraisers out of the money they pledged to assist her.

31-year-old Jessica Smith reportedly said she was being treated for Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer, and she reached out to the public using GoFundMe and Facebook in an alleged attempt to raise money.

In the fundraisers, Smith, reportedly using the name Jessica Veronica Cornell, allegedly stated that she was suffering from her treatments and that she was struggling to make ends meet due to the high cost of her medical bills.

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A New Jersey contractor was accused of insurance fraud after a surveillance camera allegedly revealed that he had purposely faked it when he slipped on ice and fell on the ground before filing the claim.

57-year-old Alexander Goldinsky is an independent contractor who was recently hired to provide his services to a company in Woodbridge.

While on the job one afternoon the surveillance camera in the break area for the company’s employees reportedly caught footage of a man who is believed to be Goldinsky. He is seen holding a cup of ice that spills to the floor in what is suspected as a premeditated act before he dropped to the ground on his back and remaining there.

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At a Georgia Walmart on the 4th of July, a minivan carrying a man, a woman, and four female children was seen on surveillance as the children allegedly helped the adults illegally take car batteries from the business and put them into the vehicle.

After the discovery that the store appeared to be missing several car batteries, and while investigating the cause of the loss on their security video footage, a minivan with six individuals was seen parked near one of the inventory storage areas located on the outside of the building.

Four little girls, the youngest suspected as being 5 or 6-years-old, were reportedly shown removing the batteries from the secured storage place after the adult woman accompanying them allegedly smashed the lock off using what was appeared to be a hammer. Both of the adults also purportedly took part in packing the batteries into the vehicle.

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Louisville resident Kingsley I. Ekpendu has been accused of targeting elderly people using a hoax consisting of telling them they had won cash prizes in a sweepstakes. He allegedly extorted money from the assumed winners after sending them counterfeit checks to deposit into their bank accounts. He then asked that they overnight money to a specified address. It is suspected that he was able to con hundreds of thousands of dollars from people in this manner.

Police stated that between September 2 and October 4 Ekpendu allegedly mailed letters to three or more addresses announcing they were winners of the Publishers Clearing House Super Cash Giveaway. The letters held fraudulent checks for amounts between $6,000 and $8,000, and instructions to deposit the check and overnight mail an amount ranging from $5,200 to $7,000 in order to claim their winnings.

Law enforcement received information from a local shipping company who became suspicious of the number and size of the packages being delivered to an address that appeared to be a vacant dwelling. Ekpendu received the first two of the three packages, and police intervened before he was able to get the third.

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A California woman, Denise Huskins, described the “hell that we have survived” to her abductor, who was sentenced to 40 years in prison. The police originally dismissed this case as a hoax because it was so elaborate and downright bizarre.

Huskins was held for two days, after being kidnapped and sexually assaulted by the abductor, which she describes as physical and psychological torture. The disbarred lawyer, Matthew Muller, reportedly snatched her from her home in San Francisco two years ago.

“I still have nightmares every night,” she said, fighting back tears. “Sleep is not rest for me; it is a trigger.” Her boyfriend was bound and drugged during the kidnapping. He said “he can not and will not ever be the same.” U.S. District Judge Troy Nunley called the abduction a “heinous, atrocious, horrible crime” as he sentenced 39 year-old Muller. Muller faced up to life in prison, but prosecutors agreed to 40 years in exchange for his guilty plea. Muller’s lawyer wanted a 30 year sentence arguing that Muller had manic depression and could be rehabilitated with proper treatment.