Articles Tagged with dmv

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A Los Angeles police officer has been accused of stealing a truck from an Orange County used car lot and using the vehicle for a year after falsifying the records to reflect that it had been recovered.

45-year-old Matthew Calleros resides in Whittier, California.

Calleros is employed as an officer with the Hollenbeck division of the Los Angeles Police Department.

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Scott Radtke, owner of California Motoring Company in Clovis, CA works as a broker by matching interested buyers with sellers of automobiles. Court documents allege Radtke conned at least $2.8 million from 17 car dealerships, 11 financial institutions and 48 customers through fraudulent car sales transactions.

Beginning in September 2016 the Department of Motor Vehicles started receiving several complaints from Radtke’s customers who had purchased cars and never received titles or registration, and car dealerships that never received money for sales. DMV issued a statement that they have a zero tolerance policy for business conducted in this manner and they opened an investigation.

Radtke is suspected of employing several methods of stealing money from clients, many of whom were reported as elderly. Some of the accusations include scamming customers who had purchased vehicles for which he accepted payment. He then forged their names on fraudulent loan applications or payment plans from lenders for thousands of dollars over the amount of the initial transactions, which would force them by contract to foot the bill for their purchased vehicle a second time. Another alleged ploy took the form of accepting and selling trade-in vehicles without giving customers the money he had acquired from the sales.

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blurryThe Orange County Sheriff’s Department has issued a bulletin that their task force will be in full effect on July 4 to combat the increased number of individuals potentially driving under the influence of alcohol (DUI). The task force will be deploying deputies and officers to numerous checkpoints throughout Orange County in anticipation of people getting behind the wheel after having too many drinks. The CHP also plans on having additional officers in the field.

Planning ahead is always the best idea. If you are planning on drinking, always designate a sober driver. If you have been drinking and think you may be under the influence, always arrange for an alternate method of getting home. Likewise, if you see someone who is drunk and is attempting to get into their car, take away their keys and help them make other arrangements to getting where they are going safely. Calling a friend, family member, or a taxi is always a better choice than getting behind the wheel.

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camera rollUnder California Vehicle Code §12500, driving without a valid license can result in a citation. Lacking evidence of liability insurance is a violation of Vehicle Code §16028 and a first-time offense can result in a fine of between $100 and $200, plus penalty assessments.

With all of the cards we’re required to keep track of, sometimes we misplace our driver’s license. If your glove compartment is anything like mine, finding a credit card-sized evidence of liability insurance amid a disorganized mess of papers, manuals, sunglasses and loose change is going to be difficult. Add an impatient police officer standing next to your car, and you’re going to get nervous. This nervousness can be misconstrued by the police officer as you being under the influence of a drug and may result in a breath and/or blood test. Even if you are not under the influence, an arrest can often jeopardize your employment and any professional licenses you may hold.

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The Orange County Sheriff’s Department is warning residents of Orange County to plan ahead for festivities tonight that involve alcohol. The agency will be deploying multiple DUI checkpoints throughout the area with the intention of arresting anybody who is driving a vehicle who is under the influence of alcohol.

Sheriff Sandra Hutchens recommends planning ahead to get a safe ride home at the end of the night. Such plans can include designating a sober driver, using a taxi service, or calling a sober friend or family member to give you a ride home. They also recommend taking car keys away from any individual who appears to be intoxicated so they are unable to drive.

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A Florida man Lazaro Sopena, wanted to help his new wife carry on her Vietnamese surname, and so decided to change his last name to Dinh when they were married in honor of his wife–opposite the usual custom of women adopting their husbands’ surnames.

After their marriage, he presented his marriage license to his local DMV showing that he had a new last name in effort to obtain an updated driver’s license, just as a woman would. The agency granted his request and issued a new license without any complications.

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Getting arrested for a DUI or DWI in Orange County can be one of the scariest moments of your life. In the confusion of having to perform field sobriety tests, take a blood alcohol test and being taken to jail, you may not have noticed the pink sheet that the officer gave you if and when he confiscated your driver’s license. That pink sheet of paper serves as your temporary license and has an important warning: “You must call the DMV to schedule a hearing within 10 days of your arrest”.

Why is this so important? When you are arrested for a DUI or DWI, there are two agencies that prosecute you– the state (meaning the District Attorney’s office or City Attorney for those living in Anaheim) and the DMV. The state can impose penalties such as jail, fines, classes, community service and probation. The DMV imposes an additional penalty- it tries to suspend your driver’s license.

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The Fifth Amendment is at issue this week in two high-profile cases: the marital mishap of professional golfer Tiger Woods and the surprise convictions of the American student perhaps wrongfully convicted of killing her roommate, Amanda Knox and her boyfriend. The Constitution protects each and everyone of us from false confessions or prosecutorial twisting of our words. Simply put, it grants us the right to remain silent. Tiger Woods has, of course, invoked this right. Amanda Knox, however, spent days talking with Perusian investigators without an attorney. She was deprived of sleep and told to “imagine” scenarios under which her roommate could have been killed. She did. Investigators then called those scenarios “explanations” and within days of the murder, she was publicly touted as her roommate’s killer.

The Amanda Knox trial has received so much attention because of the lack of otherwise credible evidence. Although there was a ton of forensic evidence, none of this evidence linked the girl to the crime and the defense was not allowed to bring in its own forensic evidence, showing she could not have committed the murder. The conviction of this young girl with no known motive and no criminal record led former OJ Simpson prosecutor John Kelly to declare this “the most egregious international railroading of two innocent young people I have ever seen… It’s a public lynching based on rank speculation.”

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After several days this headline continues to highlight the front page of ocregister.com. Reader’s comments are scathing with “get rid of her now- she is a cancer in that department” and “this little piggy won’t be able to driver for 1 year” ** being among the most caustic. I feel for Monica Aguilar, who was was pulled over around 9:25 p.m. on the eastbound 10 Freeway in Los Angeles, according to the California Highway Patrol. Although originally stopped for tinted windows, officers suspected intoxication, gave her field sobriety tests and tested her blood alcohol concentration (BAC), which came in above .08, the legal limit. She was booked into jail and later released.

I feel for her because in addition to the court and DMV’s onerous penalties that come with a DUI conviction, severe public condemnation like the comments above and employment consequences (she may very well lose her job over the arrest), she may not receive the due process that each and every one of us are entitled to. Her case will no doubt receive special attention from prosecutors and judges and valid defenses will be cast with an air of suspicion. Imagine if her attorneys reviewed the blood alcohol machinery’s calibration logs and found that the machines were not properly calibrated and concluded that her blood alcohol result cannot be trusted (a common practice of DUI lawyers.) What juror is not going to say to himself “she’s only arguing this technicality because she’s a police officer and she knows the ropes?” Demanding accurate evidence before depriving someone of their liberty is something that we should want for each of us, even police officers.

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