Articles Tagged with punishment

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The principal of an Oklahoma school is facing legal troubles after allegations regarding the amount of force he used while punishing two elementary school children with a paddle.

50-year-old Gary Gunckel is the principal of Indianola Public Schools in Oklahoma.

On September 6, a 10-year-old and 11-year old boy was punished by Gunckel when he hit them on their behinds with a wooden paddle after they got into a fight at school.

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A preteen who failed to do his homework was allegedly punished by being physically assaulted by his mother who is now being charged for the incident.

In May, a 12-year-old boy got in trouble when his mother learned that he did not do his homework. She allegedly issued his punishment by abusing him in different ways.

The boy’s mom, Sharleen Hidalgo, has been accused of harshly criticizing her son, in addition to several types of physical assaults such as punching and kicking, due to his failure to complete class assignments.

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A father and his girlfriend have been accused of child abuse and kidnapping after it was discovered that the couple had allegedly been forcing the man’s son into a locked space underneath the staircase for hours at a time over a suspected period of two to three months.

30-year-old Alex Craig Shadlow, and his 39-year-old girlfriend, Traci Lynn Tyler, share a home in Ackley, Iowa, along with Shadlow’s 8-year-old son.

During the summer in 2017, Shadlow and Tyler were reported to the police when their neighbors saw that they had placed the child inside of a tent to sleep for the night in the backyard during a lightning storm with heavy rain. The officer who investigated the claim made by the neighbor reported the incident to the Iowa Department of Human Services.

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An Oklahoma man who was left to care for his girlfriend’s child as she ran errands on Saturday is suspected of causing injuries to the boy by striking him as punishment for opening a Christmas present early without permission.

Bridgette Payne enlisted her boyfriend, Wesley McCollum, to babysit her 5-year-old son Ayrian while she finished her holiday errands. At some point during the time she was out shopping McCollum allegedly used physical disciplinary measures when he noticed Ayrian had gone under the Christmas tree and opened one of the wrapped gifts.

When Payne returned home McCollum informed her that he had sent Ayrian to bed early because of his misbehavior, and she went into the bedroom to check on her son. She became highly distraught when she noticed bruises covering his body and the impression of a hand on his face as if he had been slapped. When Payne asked the child what happened she reported that he told her, “Wesley hurt me bad mama.”

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I was in Bellflower Superior Court yesterday when a 30-something year old woman was taken into custody for failure to complete her batterer’s treatment program or anger-management classes. The public defender tried earnestly to appeal to the judge’s sympathies, explaining that the girl had suffered a pulmonary embolism and had not been working, so she couldn’t afford to pay for the classes. Yikes! A pulmonary embolism? People die from that! The woman did look healthy, but that certainly seemed like a reasonable excuse for being behind in court-ordered classes. The judge took a moment, flipped through the court file and finally said “if she wants to admit her probation violation, I’ll give her 120 days in jail.” 120 DAYS??? The injustice! How could the judge be so unforgiving? I mentally rallied to the girl’s side, until the judge sighed “counsel- she’s had FIVE years to get these classes done.” The woman took the 120 days.

This scenario is not uncommon. Walk into any Orange County criminal courtroom and you will undoubtedly see either someone with an excuse for having not performed some court-ordered obligation or being taken into custody for not performing some court-ordered obligation. This is a look at the most common (and most frustrating) excuses that judges and lawyers or attorneys hear and an explanation as to why they often fall on deaf ears.

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