Articles Tagged with parole

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A man from Alabama who received a life sentence after stealing $50 from a bakery is scheduled to be released from prison after his case caught the attention of a judge.

58-year-old Alvin Kennard has been incarcerated for the past 36 years due to a conviction for first-degree robbery when he stole $50 from the Highland Bakery in Bessemer with a knife in hand.

In 1984, Alabama law included the Habitual Felony Offender Act, which determined that a fourth-time offender would be issued a lifetime sentence.

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The manager and two other employees of a Sonic restaurant were taken into custody when a child allegedly found drugs in a kid’s meal that was purchased at the establishment.

A mother and father took their two children, ages 4 and 11, to the Sonic Drive-in Restaurant in Taylor, Texas, for dinner.

The older child was helping her brother open his kid’s meal when she reportedly saw something that she thought may have been candy. When she asked her parents what it was, they told her that the item, that reportedly resembled a pill, was not candy.

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The mother of the teenager who became notorious when he was excused from jail time on DUI charges based on the defense that he suffers from affluenza has been incarcerated on allegations that she violated the conditions of her bond release when she allegedly yielded a positive result on a court-ordered drug test.

Ethan Couch, a teenager who had been drinking and driving in 2013 resulting in four fatalities, was pardoned from serving a 20-year prison sentence and instead sentenced to rehab and 10-years’ probation for the charges, when his attorney explained that Couch did not realize he was acting irresponsibly due to a wealthy upbringing resulting in his psychological disconnection from the norms of the status quo; a condition also known as “affluence.”

In December 2015, after his trial, a man who resembles Ethan Couch was seen in a short video clip posted on social media where he appeared to be consuming alcohol. This was in violation of Couch’s parole order that he not partake in drinking, driving or drug use for 10-years.

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36-year-old Jessica Godoy Ramos has been accused of posing as an immigration attorney and representing several immigrants seeking legal citizenship status, charging thousands of dollars for services she never provided. Ramos allegedly assumed the identity of a New York lawyer with a similar name and stole her bar license number allowing her to work undetected for several years.

A criminal complaint against Ramos claims her clients believed she was a legitimate lawyer until many of them showed up for appointments at U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) that were never scheduled. Though Ramos filed immigration petitions in some cases, it is alleged that she performed no tasks for some of the clients she billed. In addition, she allegedly issued counterfeit immigration parole documents with which a client was able to enter the U.S.

In February Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) received information from the USCIS concerning five individuals represented by Ramos who tried to pick up green cards that did not exist, resulting in the decision to open an investigation.

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NFL network star Darren Sharper has recently pled guilty or no contest to drugging and raping a total of nine women in multiple states reports say.

While working as an analyst for the NFL network Sharper reportedly approached two women at a nightclub in West Hollywood in October 2013. He invited them to a party telling them he had to stop by his hotel room first. While they were inside his hotel room he offered the women drinks. One of the women woke up naked to Sharper, while he was sexually assaulting her. A few weeks later he was at the same nightclub and again, invited two women to a party, telling them he needed to stop by his hotel room.The women apparently lost consciousness sometime after.

For several months Sharper allegedly repeated these tactics across four different states. Over a dozen women eventually came forward, which led to criminal convictions five jurisdictions, including federal court.